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20121116
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to washington-- if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, it would push the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, extending yesterday's sharp losses. the do
that will never change, prudential. >> wherever our trains go, the economy goes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> additional corporate funding is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the an nenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. two men faced off for what each said would be his final campaign competing for the hearts and the minds of an economically stressed electorate. president obama won the much discussed battleground states. he won the electoral vote. he won the popular vote of -- and he won an america that revealed itself to be more divided than ever. today the president walked into the east room saying elections have consequences. >> what the american people are looking for is corporation. they're looking for consensus. they're looking for common sense. most of all, they want action. i intend to deliver for them in my second term i expect to find willing partners in bot
. it is an anomaly. is an authoritarian regime running the world's second- biggest economy. modern leaders paying homage to pass commonness, mouse at all -- mao tse tung included. >> we must crack down on corruption at all times and thoroughly investigate cases of major corruption. anyone who breaks the law, whoever they are, must be brought to justice without mercy. gregg's the successor, the current vice president, was chosen by party leaders five years ago in a process of back room deals and compromises. he will be installed as the new general secretary next week. outside, china looks increasingly modern. there is a widespread sense that growth is slipping and what is needed now is more reform. but a fear that the party may not be able to relax the market still has on part of the economy or submit itself to more checks and balances. >> the pressure for real reforms is building in chinese society. the last 10 years were a lost decade. >> instead, the communist party has tightened its hold and become more intolerant of those who question its right to will. this way, a taxi drivers have been told
today, the biggest talk in town was about the economy. president obama and the republican speaker made their views known on the upcoming fiscal cleiff approaches. both men agreed on the urgency to act. the devil is in the details. >> ladies and gentlemen, that the president and the vice- president of the united states. >> del left the supporters fool you, he knows there is no honeymoon the second time around. he is straight into a living and economic crisis in demanding compromise from politicians. dodge the american people understand we will have differences in disagreements in the months to come. they get back. but on tuesday, they said loud and clear that they won't tolerate this function for politicians that view compromise as a dirty word when americans are out of work, families and small business owners are still struggling to pay the bills. >> automatic tax rises and cuts to government spending could take more than $600 billion out of the economy, leading to 2.1 million jobs lost shrinking by half a percent sign. such a prospect has spooked global markets. riding high on re-elec
to preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >>
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session. the president made it clear in his victory speech last night that he thinks the country wants an end to gridlock. >> tonight, you voted for action, not politics as usual. ( applause ) you elected us to focus on your jobs,
now moody's has a negative outlook on the u.s. economy. worries about a fiscal freefall, kept wall street stocks in check: the dow and nasdaq fell a fraction, while the s&p was up a fraction. american businesses are not only concerned about the fiscal showdown in washington, but also about corporate earnings. nearly all of the s&p 500 firms have reported numbers, and profit growth is the slowest since the recession in 2009. and the majority of firms are also reporting disappointing revenues. here's erika miller with a look back at the quarter, and a look ahead. >> reporter: earnings season is drawing to a close. and for many firms it's good riddance. nearly all of the s&p 500 have reported quarterly numbers, and according to s&p capital i.q., profits are up a measly 2%. thomson reuters and factset crunch the numbers slightly differently, and believe profits are actually down. the bigger concern is revenue growth. s&p has the most optimistic analysis with a 0.6% gain. the other two firms see negative growth. firms face an almost universal problem: a slowing global economy. >> compan
at the barber shop run by ivan loyd. obama has another chance to get the economy back on track. ?an he do it chairma >> when you see things that are happening on the economic front and the last couple months, that is a good sign. >> if you think obama is on the right track? >> yes. >> how to deal with a country so undivided. the wealth gap is clear. so is the ideological divide. the president has to work with a split congress. in the senate they strengthen the narrow majority. in the lower house, republicans still have solid control. spending is where the first battle looms. legally government spending could be cut automatically by six under $20 million. >> we are ready to be led, not as democrats or republicans, but as americans theory of we want you to leave, not as -- but as americans. we want you to lead as president of the united states of america. >> some will not back down. no deal, and the resulting debt crisis will stall economic recovery. >> it is no surprise he called for economic unity. trust in the government is at an all-time low. the political camps are digging their heels
-product of growing our economy, energized by a simpler cleaner fairer tax code with fewer loopholes and lower rates for all. >> reporter: democratic senate leader harry reid also says he wants a quick fix for the fiscal cliff. but, he was clearly feeling empowered by a strong showing in the election. >> i want to work together, but i want everyone to understand you can't push us around. >> reporter: and raising taxes on the well-off is clearly a top priority. >> all the exit polling, all the polling we've done, the vast majority of the american people support that, including rich people. >> reporter: many republicans see the election as more of a return to the status quo and that will make negotiations on the fiscal cliff tricky. >> the discussion around taxes will have to be calibrated in a way that recognizes that there are certain red lines for both parties that probably will not be crossed. >> reporter: now that the election is over, policy makers are likely to feel more pressure to reach an agreement to ease the fiscal cliff. the public clearly does not like the automatic spending cuts that ar
, the year as an economy has seen a second successive quarter of contracting output. between july and september, there was a fall of 0.1% in overall economic activity. more problems for the euro zone political leadership as they try to chart a course for the single currency. the german finance minister speaking at a business conference said the challenges ahead could be addressed. >> investors cannot ignore europe as the largest economic zone in the long run. or leave it out of their economic considerations. the world needs a strong europe. >> weaker economies brought down the performance of the euro zone. italian output fell by 0.2%. spain and saw the decline of 0.3. france and germany, both registered 0.2% increases. those two major economies could struggle to keep up the momentum. greece has been in recession since 2007. the combination of that and the austerity program provoking protests. a german diplomat was jostled as workers amassed outside a meeting of the german and greek officials. the euro zone economic downturn will not do anything to ease tensions. >> after a week of
into a difficult first quarter in terms of the economy next year. so this is almost a situation where you can't hope for or root for any outcome. you have to let it play out and assess what its impact on the economy can be. but the risks right now are to the downside. the sad thing is that as we speak, the economy is actually doing pretty well. >> susie: that's good to hear. as you know, a number of very high-profile c.e.o.s are meeting with the president at the white house today, the c.e.o.s from companies like ibm and xerox and general electric. how much sway do you think these c.e.o.s have over the president? >> if he is smart, he'll listen to them. but that is not the constituenconstituency will eled him. the coalition that elected him supports his hard line on taxes as a percentage of the total package, and he has an obligation -- incidentally, i think an ideological belief that he has to go that way, and that's -- i think that raises the odds of a difficult -- a very difficult period here politically. and while he loyc listens to them and went through the theatrics of having met with th
that is divided, there was an earthquake. it was an election that, republicans should have won in a bad economy, with all that money, and they lost virtually every group. they even lost cubans in florida, which used to reliable vote. so you have to ask what does the republican party do next? but that is not my top priority frankly. >> don't broad brush it excessively. the republicans kept the house, the democrats kept the senate and the president, a democrat, kept the white house. that is a split verdict. >> beneath those numbers there was an earthquake john. >> oh, the hidden earthquake. nobody felt it? >> everybody feels it. >> nothing on the restrictter scale but there was -- on the scale. >>> when you think we had 23 million people unemployed and the worst in our history and he still carried it through. i would call it a landslide under the conditions he had to run. i think it was a decisive victory. >> it was on several counts. first the exit polling showed most of the voters did blame the economic problems on bush and they wanted to give obama more time to work on it. pretty significant c
is in recession for the second time in three years. unemployment is still going out. the economy is weakening, yet further tax increases are in the pipeline. >> there were protests in at least six european countries today. much of the transport was shut down in a country where unemployment is nearly 26%. in portugal there was a general strike. in greece, protesters cried, and enough is enough. the economy has shrunk 23%. >> they have to a pay attention to the social dimension in europe. at the same time, they have to be a bit more social. they have to be a bit more gentle, but i think they should not step away from austerity measures. >> the stories of hardship and tragedy are increasing. a few days ago, a woman in northern spain committed suicide after being ejected by her home. these protesters are camping, and demanding this be stopped. people are sick of this, he said. sooner or later, it is going to explode. at times in recent weeks, it has seemed as though the eurozone crisis was weakening, but the real economy is worsening, and the frustration is available and s visible on spanish streets.
believe the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the field. we have given all our to this campaign. (cheers and applause) i so wish -- i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader so ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation. >> rose: the race revealed america's shifting fault lines. it was a national conversation carried out in a few battleground states. billions of dollars poured into the campaign as both sides sought to define the other as responsible for the country's economic and partisan gridlock. but when it became clear that the long race had ended, both candidates spoke of the need for moving past division. here is what the president said. >> and in the coming weeks and months i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together. reducing our defic
monitor is watching the fiscal cliff, but thinks the economy and the stock market will continue gaining strength. russell investment's erik ristuben joins us. >> tom: next friday's meeting at the white house over the fiscal cliff comes as credit rating agency standard and poors put the odds of going over the cliff at 15%. beth ann bovino, senior economist at standard and poor's joins us. beth anne, did you hear anything today from either the president or house speaker that gives you more or less hope about a deal before the end of the year? >> well it sounded that both the president and boehner seemed to be a little bit more interested in working together. now, again this is just one day after the election. so let's see if that holds up. it does look like there are a few olive branches out there. we'll see if it continues. >> putting the odds at one in seven, one in eight we could still go over the cliff. cow agree that that will plunge the u.s. economy into recession and an unemployment rate back over 9%. >> i'm about in agreement with them. i think there are a few details i'm looking
, they sat it out. so, you know, it was going to be hard, even with the bad economy, for obama to lose. >> i think you're right, paul it wasn't just jobs and the economy, i was climate change. it was reproductive rights. it was gay marriage. there were a lot of issues that have changed in the last ten years and the republicans just did not -- >> the democrat graphic shift, this is a realignment election. it happens once in a generation. in 1980, 91% of the people who voted for the president were white in the united states. last tuesday, it was 72%. that number is going to continue to change. and the republican southern strategy for 50 years, that they have had, which is, reach out to mostly rural, mostly religious, mostly older white people, the math does not add up anymore. barack obama had an 80/40 strategy. you win 80% of the nonwhite vote, which is 30% and you win 40% of the white vote. add that together, you get 52%. that's what he did. >> you know what i thought was interesting, though? it would seem a lot of people are talking about how this election was a wakeup call for the republic
things that, you know, we want folks to do in order to thrive in a changing economy, you've got to do that by having relationships, by being embedded in stable communities. and in my opinion the really big issue is that when you look at mass incarceration, when you look at a lot of other social changes, when you look at family breakdown, i think that these are things that are kind of like an undertow that is shaping what we're seeing happening above the surface and i think the problem is that policy has a hard time dealing with some of these things. it can make a big difference on, for example we can throw fewer people in jail and destroy fewer communities and fewer lives that way. >> california just took steps to weaken their three strikes and you're out policy. that's a step in the right direction. >> and you also have folks on both sides of the political aisle who are making progress on that. >> but in terms of washington politics it looks to me as if all the blood, sweat and tears of this campaign, all those billions of dollars ended up with the status quo. the republican leadersh
's second-largest economy. for many, the pace of political changes to slow. our world affairs editor looks at how an old political system is operating in a changing nation. >> this was once a place without a name. just a number. some secret -- so secret it was not on the map. it was an industrial zone where armaments were made. so-called district 798. now is the center for artists and galleries. young, educated people here feel increasingly left out of the system altogether. >> as a young womna, she -- woman, she worked in a missile factory. now she is a writer. >> this is at a crucial state. general reforms have to be introduced. there will be reforms but probably not as much as people hope for. i will say that there will be more protests. >> from this austere little flat in northwest beijing comes the quietly critical thoughts of a famous 23-year-old. facebook and twitter are banned here. on the chinese equivalent, she has nearly 6 million followers. more than victoria beckham. people are chatting on-line about politics and society. and strong censorship. chrysler posted something, staff
anything in the economy the market's going to show us what it's got. >> rose: tom brokaw. >> i think we have to get beyond the politics of fear. this campaign is terrifying about the other side. if that person gets in your life is all over. we've been playing by the rules of the 20th century. we now need to play by the rules of the 21st century. i agree with everything that's been said up to this point. the one step i would take beyond what david and tom said is the morning after the election i would not just reach out to the other side bud i would already have in place the private part of what i think is the important component going forward, the public/private partnership. you have to create a coalition outside of the beltway from the academy, from business and from the think tanks that can help you put this altogether and keep the pressure on capitol hill and keep the pressure on the agencies of government so that we can reform. i would just say one more thing and that is the most successful enterprise we have in america today is located in silicon valley. they're changing the world
economy can't afford that right now. certainly no middle-class family can afford that right now. >> reporter: mr. obama signed legislation extending the bush- era tax cuts two years ago, including those affecting the wealthy, but he said today things are different this time. >> well, two years ago, the economy was in a different situation. we were still very much in the early parts of recovering from the worst economic crisis since the great depression. but what i said at the time is what i meant, which is this was a one-time proposition. and you know, what i have told leaders privately as well as publicly is that we cannot afford to extend the bush tax cuts for the wealthy. what we can do is make sure that middle-class taxes don't go up. mandate, i've got one mandate. i've got a mandate to help middle-class families and families that are working hard to try to get into the middle class. that's my mandate. that's what the american people said. they said, "work really hard to help us." that's my mandate. i don't presume that because i won an election, that everybody suddenly agre
on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved econ performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with the election over, there's new talk in washington about finally coming to grips with taxes, spending and the deficit. the mammoth problem has been hanging over congress and president for many months, and now, time is running out. in just five days, lawmakers troop back to the capitol for a final, lame-duck session. and they are under mounting pressure to avoid going off the much-talked-about fiscal cliff. come january 1, the bush-era tax cuts will expire as will a 2% payroll tax cut that was passed in december of 2010. at the same time, large automatic sp
provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the investigation that felled the head of the c.i.a. has expanded, to include a high- ranking u.s. military figure. that news rippled outward from the pentagon today, and across official washington. the name of u.s. marine general john allen, the top american commander in afghanistan, surfaced o >> this is "bbc world news america." >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capit
than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united healthcare. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the downfall of david petraeus showed no sign of fading into the background today. instead, there was every indication that his admission of adultery will echo far beyond the end of his career at the c.i.a. >> a personal scandal forces c.i.a. director david petraeus to... >> i want to start out with this out of the blue thunder bolt that hit washington friday. >> brown: all weekend in washington the details kept coming along with more questions. after david petraeus' sudden resignation on friday because he had had an extra marital affair quickly revealed to involve h
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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